Another Peplum Top, Another Gingham Piece





white cords, j. crew (similar) | shoes | hat, chi o creations ;)

Concluding my trio of gingham garments--that's what happens when you buy five yards!--I made a peplum top out of Simplicity 1353, view A, a Leanne Marshall sundress pattern. I have always loved the colors the sample is in, but I generally don't do sweetheart necklines. The pattern did seem perfect for the fabric I had left though! I left off the skirt and instead made a gathered peplum.

This is a straight size 10. If I make it again, I'll make an eight, and I'll move the straps out from center on the front slightly. I changed the strap construction slightly, leaving the back of the straps free and serging the ends so that I could change the length as needed. Then you can just hand sew them in with a few stitches. I see this in ready to wear often.

Check out my label! Nominette sent them over (thank you, Nominette!!) and they are so lovely--I've been sewing them into my clothes and it really makes me feel like I have something to live up to, like, is this worth putting my name on? These are the 25 mm custom logo label, white with gold thread. They look so professional and the gold is so luxe!

I did leave off the trim along the top of the neckline. I prepared it and even pinned it on, ready to sew, but at the last minute I decided to leave it off--it seemed a bit bulky and I want to be able to layer this top. I'll probably almost always wear a thin cardigan over it.

If you were curious about the construction of that trim (I was!) it is two layers of fabric turned in a tube, pressed in half lengthwise, and top stitched along the very top of the bodice. Nothing fancy, definitely replicable on your favorite bodice pattern! I think you could do the same thing for a slightly hacky version of Gertie's significantly more complex Butterick 6019.

Do y'all have a suggestion for sewing hook and eyes at the top of zips? I feel like mine all look weird and lumpy, not invisible at all. Any tips?

One thing I enjoy about sewing matching separates is an endless opportunity for pairing them together. It's like those math problems where Allie has three tops, three pairs of shorts, and three pairs of socks--how many unique outfits can she wear? Oh wait--did I just describe the weirdest Capsule Wardrobe ever?

Do you ever make more than one garment out of the same fabric? Sometimes I feel like it could look a little weird to be wearing the same fabric all the time, even if it's different pieces--I think I'll stick to a max of one blue gingham outfit per week...

xoxo,
allie



ps: how much gingham is too much gingham?

allie J.

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14 comments:

  1. Ugh, I have the same zip problems. I think I'm just going to try and use a lapped regular zipper when I can, they turn out so much nicer. Maybe a thread chain and button would work better for this top?

    This top is so cute though!

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    1. I love a nice lapped zip, they aren't any harder than a centered zip and they turn out so nicely!

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  2. There is no such thing as too much gingham! With a cardigan over it you can wear this to work all summer long. I don't like the way my hook and eyes look either. I have even gone so far as to google "how to sew hook and eye." I think part of it has to do with tiny even stitches but even when I try really hard they look yucky. Perhaps I will try a thread chain and button, thanks Paige@Very Paige!

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    1. That's my plan! I was sad to give up the cute trim but It would have just looked lumpy :(

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  3. Don't know if this will help, but I'll share what I do for the hook closures. What I find works for hook-n-eyes is when they are just sewn to the under-layers (i.e. lining and zipper) and the stitching doesn't go through to the 'seen' side of your fabric. Also, the hook-n-eyes should be sewn so they barely stick out of the edge of your fabric - this way when they close they bring the fabric edges so close you don't see any closure. Oh, and one more tip...make sure the hook is facing into the garment with it's flat edge out towards your skin...otherwise it hurts (at least on me)!

    I too have made more than on garment from the same fabric - I unusually try to go with completely different styles (and accessories) when I do. Hey, there's nothing wrong with making the most of a fabric you like!

    I've looked at making Simplicity 1353 before but assumed it called for boning. Does it? (I like your version, Allie.)

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    1. It does not--it actually asks you to interface the whole bodice, which I have never seen elsewhere and which seems crazy to me! I skipped that for breathability... and thank you for the hook and eye tips!! I left it off of this make thinking I would crowdsource me answer and put it on after ;)

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  4. You can never go wrong with gingham! I love the pieces you've made.

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  5. Maybe people will just assume you like Gingham? I thought the same about using the same pattern over and over again. So far no one has said anything, even when I wore my five versions in a row. They probably think I must really like wrap dresses. And I do. :-)

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    1. That's the way to get the most out of your pattern! I think if you pick a pattern that fits well and is versatile, you can make it lots and lots and people generally won't notice :)

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  6. This is so darn cute, Allie! The perfect summery top. I agree with Paige on the button/thread loop option.

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    1. I've never done a thread loop but I will have to give it a shot!

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  7. Very cute! I love gingham too.
    It took me forever to figure out how to sew a hook and eye that looks nice. This is a great diagram to show the correct placement:
    http://whafi.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/sewing-hook-and-eye.jpg

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    1. this is just what I need, thank you!

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