Sorbetto vs. Sorbetto

I don't do this sort of thing often on the blog, but I thought this was too interesting to pass up, even if the photos are a bit boring. Next week--back to prettiness :)
Colette's Sorbetto was, I think, my very first PDF pattern, and in fact I made several versions as I was learning to sew for myself. In concept, it's a great wardrobe-building tank--there's a reason there are so many woven tee and tank patterns out there. In execution, I think it was frustrating for many people, especially those of us new to sewing who couldn't tell if it was us, or the pattern, that didn't work. As beginners, those of us used to ill-fitting ready to wear find it difficult to tell if things fit, let alone how to fix them if they don't, and are easily disappointed and disenchanted with sewing if those first few projects don't turn out the way we hoped, so in my opinion, it's extra important that beginner patterns are expertly designed and drafted to maximize chances of success. If we want this little sewing circle to expand (and we do, y'all!!), beginners need to persevere and become advanced beginners, then intermediate sewers, and they just. will. not. if their first projects are flops. Recently Colette's been reworking several of their patterns from a new block, I decided to make both the old (in the pictures above, shown on the left) and new (on the right) Sorbettos recently as a little sewing experiment. The newly rereleased Sorbetto is supposed to provide a (free!) look at the new block. Lotttsssss of details below the break!



"Block" is the industry term for what home sewers (that's me!) call a "sloper," which is the basic pattern used to make garments. For example, if I took a billion measurements and made an Allie-sized bodice sloper, then I could make lots of design changes to the sloper (add ease, rotate darts, move neckline, etc.) and it would look totally different, but still fit me. Although I wish everyone used Allie-shaped slopers, most professional pattern companies use a standard block made to fit industry-standard measurements (although some do their own thing, i.e. Sewaholic's block is pear-shaped, SBCC's block is petite, etc.).

What does this have to do with Colette? Well, it has been rumored that the old Colette block was not based on an industry-standard figure, but was in fact Sarai-sized, designed to fit the founder. Naturally, if I had a pattern company, I'd want the patterns to fit me, too! Now, think about all the changes you have to make to a standard-sized pattern to get it to fit your individual, non-standard body. Maybe you have to bring up the waist, do an FBA, a narrow shoulder adjustment, a flat butt adjustment... you get the idea. If you know you are working from a standard block, you know you will probably have to do a certain set of adjustments. On the other hand, if the patternmaker is not clear about their block, you can not know what adjustments you will or will not have to make. Using Sewaholic (pear-shaped block) and Simplicity (industry-standard block) as an example, I know that when making Simplicity patterns I will generally have to grade up in the hips, and maybe even do a small bust adjustment (SBA). Because Sewaholic tells you that their patterns are for pear-shaped figures (like mine) I know that I do not have to make those adjustments--they are built in! Neither of these are bad, because I know the shape of the pattern and I know my body, and I can help those two things line up. If half of that equation is missing, and there is not clarity about the block the patterns are built on, you can't help the patterns line up with your body without lots of trial and error. Trial and error is tough on beginners, especially if they buy sewing patterns hailed as "patterns that teach" but that don't provide them with the appropriate tools.

Back to Sorbetto! I was super curious about the new Sorbetto, because although they've talked a lot about changing their block, they haven't said much on who it is designed to fit! (Here is Colette's post about their new block and the process they have been using to improve it.) Industry standard, or...? Let's find out! In the interest of science, I made two Sorbettos--one version of old Sorbetto, and one version of new Sorbetto, v.1, which is the version with identical style lines. Looking at the old and new size charts, you can see that the body measurements are identical through size 16, and put me in a size 2 for the bust, a 4 in the waist, and a 6 for the hips in both patterns. In the interests of science, I didn't do any pattern adjustments in either pattern besides grading between sizes, but by looking at the complete garment measurements I could tell there would be noticeable differences in fit, even before I started sewing! The new Sorbetto is has 1 7/8" more ease in the bust and 2 1/8" more ease in the hips, in addition to being 3/8" longer than the original. For reference, here's the old size chart:
And the new size chart:
Old Sorbetto: I remembered the old Sorbetto as not fitting me well at all--I used to have several versions as I mentioned above, but had gotten rid of all of them ages ago. It turns out, the old Sorbetto actually fits me pretty well! It's not perfect by any means, but I would only have to make a few simple changes to reach a pretty reasonable fit: drop the bust dart by about 1/2", shorten them by the same amount (they are practically on top of my bust apex), and carve out the front armscyes. I'm not sure if some of this would be fixed by sizing up one (although my bust is definitely not 35", sadly). It's also very short, so I'd probably want to lengthen it a bit, and the side seams flare out wildly (that's just poor drafting) so I'd bring them in a bit.

New Sorbetto: Woah, what a difference! It seems to me that Colette heard the complaints (the bust darts are always too high! the armscyes are always too tight!) and waayyy overcompensated in the opposite direction. While the bust darts on the old version are too high, by about 1/2", the new bust darts are almost 2" too low. In addition to being too low, the bust darts are much larger than the original, and so the bust is huge on me; although the shoulders/upper bust fit me nicely, from the bust down I am swimming in this pattern. (That additional ease reflected in the finished garment charts is accurate.) I know I am not busty, and most indie pattern companies draft for a larger bust than mine (say, a C cup) but there's room for like 87 more cup sizes or a small infant inside this top. (If my middle school wishes ever come true and my boobs grow like 10 sizes overnight, I know which top I can turn to.)  I found the armscyes to be a touch too large for my tastes, as well. Additionally, the drafting errors on the old pattern have been resolved, but new ones have sprung up in their place: sewing the dart leaves you with a serious angle in the side of your pattern, like the side seam was not trued after drafting the dart. Since the back side seam is straight, it makes it tricky to sew the front and back side seams together--this is a mistake that I would expect from a beginner drafting project, but not from a big company like Colette. I won't make this again.

I honestly went into this experiment expecting the old Sorbetto to be really ill-fitting and the new one to be much improved, but unfortunately, I found the opposite to be true. While the original certainly has some drafting errors and shortcomings, for me, the old Sorbetto would be a perfectly reasonable tank top after a few small adjustments. The new Sorbetto, on the other hand, does not work for me at all and would need to be totally overhauled for me to feel confident about its fit. Although it is a free pattern, I'd rather pay the $10-ish for a better tank pattern. Although I haven't sewn it, the Liola looks lovely for my money, has a sweet little back pleat detail, and the user-submitted examples on Indiesew all look like they fit decently.

Have you made the old or new Sorbetto--or both? Do you have a favorite tank pattern? I'm in the market! ;)

xoxo,
allie

ps: the old version of the Sorbetto appears to have been scrubbed from the site. i had a copy ages ago (as I mentioned already) but the PDF was on an old computer, so thanks so much to Indu from Kaleidothought for coming through with an old copy in a pinch!

allie J.

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47 comments:

  1. This post was so informative! I'm new to sewing (have sewing machine and patterns, need fabric and gumption to sew them), so I really learned a lot from your experiment here

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  2. This is really fascinating. I had the same fit issues as you did with the original Sorbetto, but I also remember it being really right across the back. It was one of the first PDF patterns I made as well, and I was pretty discouraged. I think you make a great point about the responsibility that comes with designing a beginner pattern. I hadn't thought about that before.

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  3. I so agree everything and wish more pattern companies would publish their block measurements.

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  4. Thanks for doing this - the old sorbetto actually fit me pretty well (I'm big busted) - the only change I made was to lengthen it a bit. The illustrations I've seen of the new one have made me pause, and I think I'll just keep my old one.

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    1. It's so short!! This is the size 6 length and I would still add a few inches to it. Don't delete your old PDF, it's not available any more :)

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  5. Thank you so much for taking the time to do this and post such a detailed comparison! This is extremely useful :)

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  6. Thanks so much for the comparison! I am a new sewer and it's really difficult for me to imagine what the line drawing will look like "in the cloth", so to speak. Posts like this are very helpful, especially as a fellow pear .

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  7. I never comment on sites, but I thought this was such a great piece and am glad that you wrote it despite it being "boring," which it was not! I love that you mentioned that there is a responsibility for companies with beginning patterns. I made the old Sorbetto and am a true novice/beginner sewer- and although I love it, it does not fit me well at all (so short, very wide/blocky on me, etc.). Being a new sewer, I didn't know how to make the fixes it needed and even cut down the middle of the back to make it less wide (I have a feeling this is what NOT to do lol). I was excited to see the new Sorbetto but am now contemplating whether to make a new version based on your review... I'll think about it for now but appreciate the honest review.

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  8. Thanks for this post! Thorough, informative, and interesting, as always. I love your blog!

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  9. I know I made an "old" sorbetto and that I never wore it....with MMM right around the corner I should try it on again and see what is up. It is a fast sew. Thanks for the great post

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    1. I was thinking the same thing! I was so pleasantly surprised by the fit of the old one that I might have a go at it to tweak the fit! I currently don't have a go-to-tank pattern...

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  10. Great post comparing the two! I am really interested in the differences since Melissa and I are getting ready to share our makes soon.

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  11. Thanks for this! I had downloaded the old Sorbetto (but never made it), based on your assessment I may just stick with the old one. I've always like Colette patterns and felt they fit me pretty well, but I am much bustier.
    P.S. Did you get the fabric for this from Mulberry Silks in Chapel Hill?? (You've mentioned before your from the Durham area) I just picked up this exact fabric from them for a to be determined summer dress! :-)

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    1. I got mine from my Sew Conscious box, but I do love Mulberry! I look forward to seeing what dress you make with it, it's a beautiful fabric!

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  12. Thank you for the interesting comparison. I have wondered exactly how Colette drafted their new block, and how it differs from their old one. Your post doesn't fill me with confidence regarding their drafting skills! Now I'm curious as to how the flat patterns compare - I might download the new Sorbetto and compare it to the old one.

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  13. Thank you for your post. You are so right about how important even "some" success is to those of us just starting to sew (or sew again after decades off). It is such a downer to finish project that I started with enthusiasm (and persevered through, studying every step) to find that the result fits no better than a clearance rack find from the store. Now that I have had a couple of "good enough to wear" outcomes, it is easier to see the shortcomings and have an intellectual "how can I improve next time" response rather than an emotional dump. I'm willing to bet that most people who sew hate to waste (materials, time, effort, etc) but are willing to invest those things for a learned skill and useful garment. Thanks for recognizing us newbies and our perspective.

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  14. This is a really great comparison. I made the sorbetto a long time ago when Collete was still one of the only small pattern companies and immediately hated it. I avoid their patterns now, which is too bad because the concepts are nice.

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    1. I love the style of their patterns, especially the more vintage-y ones (naturally) but the simpler more classic ones are lovely too.

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  15. Thanks for the great comparison. Just from the photos it looks like the old version fits much better. I've made the old version last year and was interested in the differences. I wonder if the new block with the extra ease now matches the big 4 patterns with their extra ease.

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  16. Awesome post! Really good to see things side by side. Also - Look at the differences in the shape of the neckline! Massive changes there.

    It bugs me that such simple patterns are so difficult for newbies! It really puts people off I am sure. That combined with having to know that the finished measurements of a Big 4 pattern are on the pattern pieces, not the envelope - AND! That the cheap sewing machines like Brother and Singer and Toyota that you get in the big-box stores are no good...it really puts the barrier up against new sewers and makes them think they are worse at sewing than they really are. Oh and don't get me started on sewing with polyester! ;-P

    Thankfully I've never been lured by the call of Collette - I never got the hype. Could always find REAL vintage patterns for the same price or less (including the dreaded Australia-tax) and I knew that at least the measurements on the envelope would actually fit me.

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  17. I very, very rarely comment on posts on any of the sewing blogs I read, but I wanted to say thank you for posting this and being honest about your experience. I just wish I would've seen this post a week ago! I had only a few minor fit issues with the first Sorbetto top - the armholes were too tight and the top was overall too short for my preference, and those were easy fixes - and have made many, but I really liked the longer option with slight hi-low hem on the newer version. I'm not a rookie by any means, but made the rookie mistake of cutting a size based on my measurements and not the finished garment measurements (I didn't even glance at them assuming they'd be mostly the same as the original) and ended up with a "top" that was long enough to be a dress and big enough to fit another one of me inside. And this was out of fabric that I loved and had been saving for something I thought I'd get a lot of wear out of! After setting the project aside for a few days, I picked it up again tonight, trimmed more than an inch and a half off each shoulder seam and side seam, and had to cut off over six inches from the bottom, including completely eliminating the hi-low hem to account for having to take it in so much. So now it's essentially the same as my other Sorbettos except the back piece is still WAY too big and bags up underneath a cardigan. The only credit I can give is that they fixed the armholes - I appreciate the extra ease and didn't find them too large, personally.

    All of this is to say that your point that a pattern like this would turn someone new off of sewing is so vital and well-made. On the Colette blog post announcing the new pattern, many commenters pointed out some of the apparent fit issues with the sample on the model and they were chided by others for "complaining" about a free pattern. However, from a company that has as much clout in the indie sewing company world as Colette, it's not whiny to expect a pattern that will fit *with reasonable individual adjustments* in the size recommended based on body measurements. Someone new to garment sewing doesn't know to check finished garment measurements, nor will necessarily have the skills to turn a total disaster project into something generally wearable like I had to do with my Sorbetto tonight.

    It's just a bit ironic because according to the post, the new Sorbetto is supposed to be a free way to test out Colette's new block. If this is their new block, I won't be making anything from them ever again, which is a shame, because I used to really adore their patterns.

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    1. Oh no, I'm so sorry your experience was so unpleasant! I also love the split hem, but I think I'll stick to adding it to more tried and true patterns I have. I totally agree with your comments here about expecting even a free pattern to fit somewhat--especially one that is intended to introduce the "new and improved fit"!!

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  18. What an interesting post! I agree that the first version of your top looks better! Colette patterns have been some of the most poorly drafted patterns I've sewn and I have given away all my makes. They can only market to beginners because once people learn to sew,they realize just how bad these patterns are. It's a shame they can't get their act together to even draft a decent tank top, But I have enjoyed reading their blog, listening to the podcast and reading the magazine.

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  19. Thank you Allie, I sewed this up as a beginner and had all the same issues with the pattern and couldn't for the life of me understand what I had done wrong. After watching your IG Story and now reading your post, I feel a sense of relief, that it is most definitely not me, but Collette. Given the whole Rue debacle from last year, I would have thought they'd finally sorted out their block issue, this is all rather disappointing.

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  20. Always good to see how certain patterns fit different body shapes.. and to know which ones to be careful of! but I have to say like Justine I really like the blog, podcast and Seamwork and actually I wouldn't be put off using their patterns again at all - but I would always check to see other reviews before I went ahead. But i'd do this for any pattern before I bought it. I feel like they are getting a bit of a bashing here and thats a bit sad - because they are a cool company.

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    1. When I started this experiment, I really thought that I would be writing up a post about how much better the new version of the Sorbetto fit as compared to the old version, which many people had issues with. I'm sad to say that didn't end up being the case--I really appreciate what Colette has done in rebranding the world of indie sewing. They're brand has suffered a lot recently but this post is not meant to bash them, simply to provide a comparison of their old, faulty block and their "new and improved fit" block, which I had high hopes for and which sadly did not meet expectations. After a lot of bad press and years and years in the business, I would expect a new pattern that is intended to regain customer trust and support ("The New Sorbetto is drafted using our new blocks. [...] Sorbetto is our way of sharing the new fit with you—for free!) would at least be perfectly drafted, even if the fit is not perfectly matched with my body.

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  21. To echo what a lot of people have said before, this is not boring AT ALL!! If anything, you've performed a vital service to us sewers—a candid, fact-based comparison between the new and old Colette block.

    5 years ago, when I first started sewing I read a lot of blogs for tutorials and advice (because my mom has forgotten much about sewing and my grandma lives too far to help me troubleshoot). So blogs have always been a very valuable (and free) resource for me. And I can't imagine I'm alone in that.

    I like that lately bloggers are more critical of various patterns and companies, as they should, because in a sense, you guys are the most accessible teachers to many beginners. You're absolutely right that beginners can't easily differentiate between a dud pattern and dud skills. So honest reviews really help people (even intermediate sewers like me) to troubleshoot the pattern and troubleshoot our skills. So keep it up!!

    On another note, I have to say I'm really disappointed by Colette. As you say, they have a very strong presence in the Indie pattern space. Heck, they're in many large retailers too! (Here in London, Liberty carries their pattern ... net to Tilly's ... which opens another can of worms for me.) The fact that they've built a sizeable following and customer base whilst offering a sub-par product really irks me. Say what you may about the ease in Big 4 patterns, at the very least the notches and edges line up! That's so basic. And if they don't, we chew them out. So it's a little baffling we give Colette so much leeway.

    My first homemade garment was a Beignet skirt. It was okay. The hips were weird, but now with more fitting experience I know how to fix it. But I really can't be bothered with any Colette patterns that have an upper body component. My time is too valuable to toile 3 times before getting a mediocre fit. ESPECIALLY not with a pattern at that price. At that price point, I can go for StyleArc, Grainline, (Tasia era) Sewholic—patterns made by people with actual drafting skills/training.

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  22. This was a great post. I made the Sorbetto years ago and it was extremely unflattering. I was/am a beginner and I made it one size (I still have never tried to grade between sizes) The Grainline Tiny Pocket tank was equally bad with huge draglines. (it was really hard to find good posts on fitting these two patterns) I've sewn since then but I have no confidence in fitting and sewing flattering things. So, I really like what you said about having a responsibility to make well made beginner patterns.

    I was thinking the new Sorbetto would solve some of my fit issues but after seeing this comparison I don't think it's worth trying.

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    1. Interesting about the tiny pocket tank! I thought about making that one too but it's not free any more, unfortunately. I don't currently have a go-to tank pattern, but then again, I don't wear tanks too too often.

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  23. This side-by-side comparison is really interesting! Thank you for sharing this! I've made the old Sorbetto and was wondering what the difference was between it and the new one. I always felt that the darts were pretty long too, and the length was a little lacking, but those are fairly simple to fix.

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  24. Thank you for taking the time to write about and photograph your Sorbetto experiences. I know from experience how time-consuming that is. Ditto to all the previous comments, except the one who feels "sad" about Colette bashing. Your post is not bashing anyone. It's a well-written, thoughtful and honest comparison/review (and certainly NOT boring!). I really have a hard time relating to the emotional response to Colette-the-company-as-a-being. They aren't our friends. And I don't get why they get a pass from so many customers when other companies don't. Especially when they are marketing THEMSELVES as something they clearly are not. There are so many new sewists out there who don't realize it's not them but the pattern which is at fault. Now THAT is what is sad.

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    1. SO many new sewers turn to indie patterns because they are "easier to use" than big 4 patterns with more hand-holding instructions to walk you through each step... but when the end result is bad and you've followed the instructions perfectly, you're even more likely to blame yourself.

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  25. Thank you for this interesting post! When I was first starting out I made three muslins of the old Sorbetto, and I never got it right (I need a pretty big FBA). After reading this, I think I probably won't return to the Sorbetto and I'll just pay for a tank I like a bit more.

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  26. It's interesting to see how different the new and old Sorbetto's are. The neckline on the old version is so much nicer, and the fit isn't bad at all. I'm kind of surprised at all the criticism for Colette patterns-I've made a a bunch of them ( Madeleine bloomers, Beignet, Chantilly, and the basic a-line skirt from their first book), some of them multiple times, and the only drafting error I've ever found was on the back inseam of the bloomers; as for fit, of course each has needed a few tweaks as pretty much all patterns do to get the fit just right, but nothing major. I suspect a lot of the problems people are having with their patterns has to do with differing body types, and possibly taking on a more complex project than one is ready for- all those Rue's that didn't fit ( at least the ones I've seen) mostly just needed length added to the upper bodice and an equal amount removed from the lower, to accommodate the makers' lower bust point, which is a problem a lot of companies have. Either way, still super frustrating!

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  27. Allie, thank you for doing this experiment and reporting on it so elaborately. It's precisely what I (for a second) considered doing, only to decide that the new Sorbetto probably wouldn't be worth my while. Looks like I was right. After my disappointment in the Sorbetto, which I made when I was just starting out as a sewer, I also decided I'd rather pay for a better pattern. I moved on to the Tiny Pocket Tank, which also had drafting issues and is no longer available. I had the most success with the Ella top by far. A good fit out of the envelope and as you said, a nice little detail in the back.

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  28. I loved this post Allie! I think its because a lot of people have felt that Colette have had a run of bad patterns recently their drafting has always been an issue with me and I did patterncutting at college! I have cancelled my Seamwork subscription as i'm finding the styles aren't inspiring and if I do go to make something i'm disappointed with fit! I guess we've been spoilt with patterndrafters like Jen from Grainline. I know they are trying to turn themselves around but is it too little too late? Its a shame as I loved the ethos!

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  29. Thanks for taking the time to do this! I had just gotten around to sewing up an "old" Sorbetto that I had cut out awhile back. It was way too short (and I can deal with croppy, shortish type tops, but this wasn't short in a cute way), and then when I saw where the darts were, I took it personally thinking "Wow, my bust is really this much lower than most people's now??" I took the thing off and it's just sitting in my closet, I never gave it another thought. There's no time I would ever think of wearing the thing. I was tempted to try the new update, you know, because the idea of the Sorbetto is good, but still I just wasn't wanting to waste the time on it again. I really enjoyed this write up, I can tell by your pictures that it still isn't right, and in fact the back for example looks better on the first one. Amazing that more care wasn't taken by Colette before releasing this! Thanks for the post.

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  30. So interesting to see this side-by-side comparison, Allie – thank you. I think many people sew precisely because they want to make clothes that fit, so it's really important that pattern companies use a block that's as close to the mythical 'average' as possible. Given a choice of common pieces like a tank, I'll always opt for a pattern company whose block is closest to my shape (Sewaholic, Deer & Doe) and I've always liked the way Colette drafts for a C-cup in my size rather than a B. But... if this is how their new block measures up then I'm not sure any of their patterns are going to be simple to fit for me from now on. The point about trueing the side seam is really disturbing – that's pretty much the bare minimum you expect from a sewing pattern, free or not.

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  31. I made the old version of the Sorbetto last summer and my arm holes were too high (I am a B-cup) and length was too short. I thought it was all me, but maybe not. I did invert the box front pleat like I had seen others do. The regular front pleat looks a little too old fashioned for me. But I did want to make some adjustments and make more of them, just haven't gotten around to it. Interesting that the arm holes seem to come down more on the new version. I did go and look at Collette's pictures of their new pattern and liked that they had a version with sleeves and a longer tunic style. I am thinking of printing the new one out and trying to marry the best of the old and the new. I actually got quite a few compliments on my shirt but maybe it is the material I used :). Such an interesting post! I haven't sewn much for myself, mostly blankets and craft items, but you sure make me want to sew more for myself Allie!

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  32. Thanks for this Allie. I haven't made the old sorbetto but have just made the new one and not impressed. I'm glad you found the same because it makes me realise it's not just me thinking it's enormous!

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  33. This is an amazing post, Allie. It may have seemed like it wasn't the most interesting thing to make or do, but it does have so much useful information in it about the new Sorbetto. Like many people I made a few Sorbettos early on and found the same sort of problems as others. I did (luckily) have the wherewithal to widen the back (easy enough to do) and tweak the bust dart. However the armscye was tight and it was only this year that I got round to making them a little larger on my favourite top. Anyway, pretty much similar issues to you. I think as I've now tweaked the pattern I may just stick with my own customized version. I was tempted to get the new one and try it out the extras. I think I'd rather spend time drafting my own sleeves / changes now. In fairness to Colette, they do publish finished garment sizes which I find invaluable. I actually think it is silly to expect a pattern to fit out the envelope after all no one is "average". Unless you either draft it yourself or use a pattern company like lekalo that customizes the pattern for you (although my experience is that I still needed to adjust a little), making changes is essential.

    Weirdly, despite tanks being an garment that appears simple. I think they are tricky and need to be fitted well. The armscye that is too low will make a reasonably wearable top with sleeves, but those armscyes need to be just right on a tank top. I made a Sew Liberated Myla tank a while ago and encountered the same sort of problems. In fact this turned out to be a far more difficult experience as there weren't enough notches on the pattern and no finished garment measurements - it was a nightmare to get the fit right, as I had to make some fairly radical changes to get it to fit right.

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  34. Thanks for this post! I was excited to try the new Sorbetto but am now not going to both. I just cut up the new tank from Seamwork though (Gretta) and am nervous it's not going to fit well now!

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  35. Honestly when I first started sewing again after a 5 year hiatus after I left FIDM. I started with the Colette Anise. Boy that pattern made me doubt all my years of sewing, pattern making and design training. Because I assumed these indie pattern companies were run by professionals with more training than I. Of course I've discovered 95% of them have no formal training at all not even home ec. There's somethings miss when learning on your own.

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  36. Great post! I started out sewing Colette patterns because they were so pretty and the instructions were so great. I think I made about 12 of their patterns, including some Seamwork ones before I was finally a competent enough sewer to realize that all of the fit issues, errors, and wackiness weren't my fault. They certainly have a lovely website, great photos, and a wonderful vibe, but I agree- it is pretty disheartening as a beginner to come up against these kind of problems. I remember making a Sorbetto and having to alter it so much to even get it to fit OK that it was barely recognizable by the time I was through. I felt like I would have been better off cutting a hole out of a pillowcase for my head and calling it good.

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  37. I made up the new Sorbetto in a size 16 and can say for certain that the finished measurements of the size 16, and the measurements of the size 16 pattern do NOT match the finished measurements on the spec... they are much smaller than stated. I found a slew of other issues with the sleeved variations so I ended up backing away from this pattern. I thought about doing a blog post but wasn't feeling confident about being openly critical (kudos to you!) so I just did a post on patternreview.com. I think the biggest disappointment for me is that the errors are so easy to see (if you know how to draft patterns) and they didn't see them at all.

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