Comfortable Cool (Simplicity 8528)


 
Alex dresses well and pretty simply--he has few pairs of chinos and a few pairs of jeans, a bunch of button down shirts, and a few cardigans, and that's what he wears most days. Guys wardrobes are so natural capsule-y, right? Despite the fact that I could make his whole wardrobe with about 5 patterns, men's patterns are so hard to come by! I have a few big 4 patterns and a few from Thread Theory, and I just got the new Liesl + Co. All Day shirt (I think this one has real potential!), and my general rule is to snap up any decent men's patterns I see, since they are few and far between!

There was obviously no question if I was going to buy Simplicity 8528--omg just look at that cover! It's amazing! When I showed it to Alex he was equally enthused. I thiiiink this is supposed to be used as a David S. Pumpkins thing (I have not seen that, so I'm not sure?) since it came out with the Halloween patterns and is called "Crazy Suit" but if you look past the wild prints it's a really decent unlined blazer pattern. I recently picked up a knit blazer pattern for myself and so the idea was already in my head; since there's basically no way a men's knit blazer pattern exists (correct me if I'm wrong) I decided to use this one! In this thick dot ponte instead of the suggested linens and poplins, the trickiest part was getting my stitches not to skip (a heavyweight ballpoint needle did the trick). I love the way the insides look since the wrong side has little stripes--it looks really cute with the sleeves rolled up and pushed up a little, don't you think?

I think Alex was a little unclear about the concept at first--is it a blazer? is it a sweater?--but I think he'll end up wearing it a lot in his regular rotation of cardigans, if only because he doesn't have a navy one. Personally, I think it looks really sharp! I used his regular blazer size (38) and the only change I made was to sew the back pleats/vent shut instead of finishing each side of the vent and pressing--this rayon/poly ponte was not about to hold a permanent press and I think sewn-shut pleats look fine for this casual style. It's pretty slim fitting even in a (stable, but still) knit and I would consider sizing up one if I made it in a woven. The lapels are slim, too--slimmer than the collar which I think looks a little funny if you notice but also, I don't know much about men's fashion, so maybe this is normal in slim lapeled suits? (You can't see this in the line drawings but you can tell if you look closely at the models.) Sadly, the pants and shorts don't have any front or back pockets--although they may have side seam pockets, it's hard to tell) so I think they're best relegated to costume pants unless you're confident adding your own!

Would y'all be interested in a men's pattern roundup? They're so hard to find! I've also just ordered some Japanese sewing books for men--the women's styles aren't for me but I'm hoping the men's stuff will be great since it's all very classic. Have you used a Japanese pattern book? So stylish!

xoxo,
allie

ps: he's such a ham :)



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Leopard Mini (Sewaholic Rae)

skirt: Sewaholic Rae (also seen here and here, pattern here) | jacket: Deer and Doe Luzerne (also seen here, pattern here)

When I had such success with my first Rae a few weeks ago and then successfully used the pattern as the skirt portion of my girly trench dress, I immediately wanted to try it one more way, as a flat waistband skirt!

I've had this leopard print twill in my stash for a few months having ordered it thinking it would be light enough to make a dress, but it's really more of a denim weight--perfect to try this new variation on the Rae! The twill would be much too heavy to gather into a waistband at my usual 2 or 3:1 skirt:waistband ratio, but the flare along with the light gathering of the Rae at the waist means I get all the poof and none of the struggle to gather too-thick fabric. (ps: If you want all the fullness of a dirndl skirt but down want all that poof right at your waistline, a gored skirt like this one is perfect.) I only made a few slight changes to the pattern itself and I mostly just guessed at what I should do. I ended up taking a little bit off of the top of each pattern piece because the waistband is built into the elastic-waisted Rae, but not into this skirt. Luckily it was a success!

I love the girly silhouette of this shorter-length full skirt in a fabric with a lot of body; I think it looks really great with matching tights and heels to give the illusion of long long legs. It would be really cute with over the knee boots, too--I don't have any of those because they don't really seem work-appropriate for me, but I like the look on other people.

I wont be giving up my dirndl skirts any time soon (after all, I have a whole class on making them) but I do love this modified version of the Rae for a lower-volume skirt, and it takes a lot less fabric, too!

xoxo,
allie

ps: if you follow the @mccallpatterncompany instagram, you may see a familiar face over there this week!



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Love Witchy (Rachel Comey for Vogue 1558)


Thank you McCall Pattern Company for sponsoring this post.

This past year I was lucky enough to attend a showing of The Love Witch, which I then immediately
added to both my amazon cart and also my "Allie's Favorite Movies" list. While the more campy aspects of the movie may or may not be to your liking, I (unsuprisingly) loved loved loved the costumes worn by Samantha Robinson, who plays Elaine, the main character and titular Love Witch. They are mostly late-60s/70s and Anna Biller, the director, made some of them herself using vintage patterns! I even bought a similar pattern to one of the costumes and intended to make it but I couldn't figure out how I would wear it and not look like, well, costumey.

Although Vogue 1558 is not a vintage or retro pattern, and honestly doesn't look much like any single dress from the movie, I think the long, pleated sleeves, midi length, and high neck give it the same feel as a lot of the 60s/70s Edwardian-ish dresses--with none of the over-the-top frills. Streamlined seventies? Yes, please. And in a knit? Even better--this dress is a dream to wear and swishes around beautifully.

The sample for this Rachel Comey dress is made in a silk jersey with an all-over print in red and shades of blue, which is gorgeous, but doesn't show off the interesting pleating that really makes this dress unique--I think this pattern really shines in a solid. The details at front and back waist are so flattering and y'all know I love a raglan sleeve! I was a little nervous going into this project, since I very rarely use Vogue patterns--for some reason they're intimidating to me--and I'd never made a designer Vogue pattern. In fact, it was very simple to make; if you have made other knit dresses or tees before and are confident about pleats, you can make this dress without issue. This is a size 10, one size down from my "body measurements" size as usual, and made without alterations besides shortening the skirt by about 4 inches (I cut off 5" but took a shallower hem than called for). Personally, I followed the instructions to the letter, but I heard from a couple of people who even left out the zipper... make sure you use a stretchy fabric with great recovery if you go that way since you want to be able to get it over your head!

Now that I'm feeling more confident about Vogue patterns I have my eye on some of their holiday releases--view B of this one would be gorgeous work as a top paired with a full skirt, right??--so this dress won't be the last Vogue pattern you see on this site! Do you have a favorite McCall Pattern Company brand? I used to wonder why they had three brands under one umbrella but I do think that Vogue, Butterick, and McCall's have different aesthetics... which one do you like best?

Photography by Alex Craig.

xoxo,
allie

ps: can you believe this is the very first vogue pattern i've ever blogged?



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Navy Lace Alston Dress


I wrote this post ages ago and just now got around to taking pictures of the dress! I wore this dress to another wedding this past weekend though, so just swap out "New York" for "St. Louis" and it basically all holds true!

Last weekend, one of my dear friends got married. It was a whirlwind trip to St. Louis and back but it was so, so worth it to see all my college roommates and, of course meet the brand new Mrs. Alston for the first time! She looked beautiful, the party was fantastic, and I wore a new navy version of the dress named in her honor.

This whole dress started back when I wanted a new dress to wear to this season's weddings and was feeling uninspired by my pattern collection. (I even looked on Rent the Runway before realizing that it's not slightly embarrassing to wear non-me-made things now, because everyone asks if I made xyz and I hate having to admit that no, I didn't! Do you have this problem? Just me?) After a while looking around at all sorts of patterns and fabric--did I want to do something body-con? maxi? embroidered tulle?--I ended up using my party dress dilemma as a great excuse to try something I had wanted to try for a while and spring for some pattern drafting classes on Craftsy. You can see more about my process start to finish here, and you can see my first, more casual(-ish) version of  the Alston here, and now here is the wedding-guest-dress as intended from the very start!

I used two fabrics gifted to me by my mom on separate occasions that just happened to match perfectly--she knows I love to wear navy! I still have tons of this lace left over, definitely enough to make a sheath dress or something, and also lots of the cotton, a Ralph Lauren stretch shirting. I'm thinking it will become a shirtdress, and I'm thinking I'll use the Granville for the top... but those are all just thoughts, of course.

Besides the fabric choice, I did make a few slight changes from Alston #1. The white eyelet Alston has sleeve bands, which I feel is a nice design detail that echoes the neckline and waistband. For this version, however, I just used the scalloped edge of the lace on the sleeves, which I think makes it a little dressier. Which do you prefer? I also took it in at the waist by 2" total since I felt the white one was a bit loose and the navy cotton I used here has some stretch. The bodice is still not quite fitted enough for the formality of the dress, in my opinion. It's very comfortable, but I don't mind a slightly snugger dress for a fancy night out. I may add a waist stay, since I feel like it's slightly long in the bodice (like 1/2"), and I suspect it's due to the heavy lace skirt pulling everything down. That's it! Otherwise, it's just the same. I felt amazing wearing this and totally like myself--that's the beauty of making it yourself, right?

I still have at least one more Alston up my sleeve... actually, a sleeveless hack! (Can you hack your own pattern?) I have no idea if it will work, and, like, don't hold your breath. In the meantime, I'll be trying to find the time to do more pattern drafting--this first project was so rewarding, I'd love to get back into it... then again, there are so many gorgeous patterns already out there just waiting for me to sew them!

xoxo,
allie

ps: for transparency, all of my blog posts are written at the time of making the project... which isn't always the time of photographing them! just in case you were wondering.



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Easiest Handmade Hostess Gifts

Is it too early to be talking about the holidays? Actually, yes, it is. But us hand-maker-y types need to get an early start on presents! The best part of the holiday season (Mid-November through January 1st here, but your location may vary) is seeing family, but the second best is going to lots of holiday parties, from friendsgiving potlucks to glitzy New Year's Eve bashes. My usual go-to hostess gift is a bottle of wine but it's also nice to add a little handmade touch to your gifting, especially when people know you made your dress and want to get in on the action a little bit. Enter the perfect combination: hand-hemmed Spoonflower tea towel + literally whatever. I have had mixed results with Spoonflower fabric (I love their sport lycra but wasn't pleased with their cotton sateen, although that was also years and years ago) but I really love browsing the very large (64 pages) collection of tea towel designs. They  are all designed to fit on a fat quarter of the linen/cotton canvas so 1 towel is $14, about the same as you'd pay at anthropologie. (They occasionally have 2 for 1 fat quarter sales, so I have learned to stock up then!)

Once your towels arrive, you just wash and hem them--easiest "handmade" present ever. (I suggest serging/zig-zagging the edges, then washing them, then finishing the hemming, since I threw 12 towels in the laundry unhemmed and ended up with a huge damp clump of towels tangled together on the frayed edges!) Then get something to wrap it around--a handmade tea towel will elevate even a grocery store bottle of wine but you could pair a potted kitchen herb with a thematic towel (this one's cute) or even wrap up a box of pasta and a fancy jar of sauce for a house-warming party. My favorite combination is towel and candle--this might be weird but I love lighting a candle in a clean, kitchen-y scent (lemon in the summer, pine in the winter) when I have to do the dishes or scrub the counters. The one I have in my kitchen now is the Lemon Lavender scent from Diamond Elm Candles (c/o) on etsy--it's handmade, 100% soy and a much nicer scent than my old lemon lavender candle from the mall! The wood wicks in their candles make a cozy crackling sound and I think one of their fall scents would be perfect for a Thanksgiving hostess gift. They smell nice, look cute wrapped in a useful and unique handmade towel, and last longer than the wine you were planning on bringing!

Do you make your holiday gifts or buy them? I generally don't do handmade gifts, but these are so easy that even I, lazy, selfish seamstress that I am, can whip up a few by the time November rolls around...

xoxo,
allie

ps: spoonflower also have a competition each year in which designers create calendar tea towels. my mom has a collection of well-loved calendar tea towels dating back years and years, some of which belonged to my grandparents, so it's nice to have some of my own as well. you can see this year's calendar design winners here--i think i like this one the best of all of them--and allll the 2018 calendar tea towels here



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Lounge Separates (Hey June Santa Fe)

 Thank you to Indiesew for providing the fabric and pattern for this top!

I may have said last time that that was the last time I'd be making pajamas for a while, but what I really meant was that this time is the last. I'm just addicted to loungewear apparently! It helps that now that I have a serger, sewing up this type of project takes mere minutes...

Since I've been wearing my Sloane sweatshirt a ton lately, I wanted to make a little pair of matching lounge shorts, and then I decided that since the sweatshirt is too hot to wear as pajamas (at least in October in North Carolina!) I should really have a lighter-weight matching top to swap out... right? (Is this how your sewing decisions are made? Just me?) Allie had this lovely super-lightweight heather-grey knit in the Indiesew shop that I knew would be perfect as an oversized Santa Fe top--I'm on a Hey June kick after my successful bell-sleeved Charleston! I sized up and love the result; this is officially the most comfortable top I own and it is getting a lot of wear in the evenings after work.

One word of warning--pay attention to the care requirements for this fabric! I washed it on medium heat and threw it in the dryer, instead of washing on cold and line drying as instructed, and it developed a bad case of tiny pinpoint holes. Oh no! Since I'll be wearing this in my house, it doesn't matter, but be aware that anything made with this fabric really should be line-dried.

The shorts are another pair of Lexi Chick Boxers--a really dreadful name, but a nice, easy pattern that you can crank out several versions of in just a few minutes! This time I added a drawstring as well as elastic in the waistband, and turned the waistband and hems to the wrong side to coordinate with my Sloane, since I used the wrong side of the fabric for the hem, cuffs, and neck band of that pattern. I wish they were a little bit slimmer through the leg since the thicker fabric makes them pretty voluminous, but honestly, figure-flattery was not topmost in my mind while making elastic waist french terry shorts? Paired with this tee, I have created the world's most comfortable outfit, and if it isn't also the most attractive thing I've ever worn, well, I'm okay with that.

I've been sewing with all these knits recently because I love that it stretches my skill set--I feel pretty confident with all different types of woven fabrics at this point but knits are a little out of my comfort zone. I also have a special project coming up (it's all planned and ready, I just have to sew it!) that is in a knit, and I really want to get it perfectly right. I can see how addicting sewing knits can be since it only takes a few seams and a lot of fitting can be eliminated by using stretch fabric! Plus, there are so many knit patterns I've never explored...

xoxo,
allie

ps: i also recently made alex a matching sweatshirt (seamwork paxton) and sweatpants (true bias men's hudsons) for his birthday and he hasn't taken them off since, so we're like all heather grey all the time now in our house! send help! :)



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Inspiration: 70s // Modern (Vogue 1558)


70s style has been trendy for the past couple of years, but I've been a little reluctant to sew much in that style since it just... so 70s! I'm a die hard 60s girl, y'all know me. I have made and loved a few things that are 70s-ish--this dress is even a 70s repro pattern--but when I finally caved and bought a real 70s vintage dress pattern after seeing The Love Witch I couldn't figure out how to sew and style it to not look costumey.

When I saw the Fall Vogue patterns though, V1558 jumped out as the perfect 70s-ish look for me--it's a Rachel Comey design, not a vintage reprint or anything, but it has that lovely high collar, long statement cuffed sleeves, and pretty below-the-knee hem of a 70s dress, not to mention some gorgeous pleats!! In a drapey knit, it's totally Halston-ish, right? Since 70s style is alll over stores (well, websites) I wanted to style this dress two sliiightly different ways: a retro look and a more modern look with a slight seventies influence.

I have all the supplies for this pattern, and I'm excited to get sewing--I picked out a coral jersey that I think will be perfect for late summer/early fall. The cover image is made in a red and blue printed silk jersey, but sadly you can't see the pleats at the waist and on the sleeves. In a solid jersey, I'm hoping the pleats will stand out more; I think it will be really nice. Wish me luck!

Does this dress seem 70s glam to you, or is it just me? Any tips on sewing Vogue patterns? I always admire them from afar but I haven't made many at all!

xoxo,
allie

ps: happy friday the 13th, y'all! seems perfect for a love-witch inspired project to start on october 13, don't you think?



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