Nani Iro Valentine (Simplicity 4475)

Just dropping in to let you know I have a new post up on the Minerva website--featuring my go-to vintage dress pattern, Simplicity 4475, and this gorgeous Nani Iro linen! Happy Valentine's day!
 
xoxo,
allie

ps: see all my posts for Minerva on my profile.


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Wiksten Haori

Megan Nielsen Dawn Jeans / A.P.C. Sweatshirt / Smartwool socks / L.L.Bean penny loafers


Hello! It has been such a long time since I've written a blog post--so long that apparently blogger got a refresh and I barely know how to use it anymore. Oops! Apparently it's (finally) time to migrate to wordpress, I guess. Anyway, I have a project to share with y'all today so you'll get at least this one last post on blogger ;)

Honestly, I can't even remember what month I made this Wiksten Haori in--it belongs to the blur of mid-pregnancy. I know it couldn't have been first trimester because I don't think I made a single thing during those three months, and I know I wore it last December, so it must have been in October or November 2019! Twenty NINETEEN! I never fell for Wiksten patterns like so many of you did, but last fall, I knew I wanted an oversized jacket for camouflage. I work at the public library and y'all, I haaaated the thought of all my library patrons asking questions about the pregnancy. With twins especially, I didn't relish the idea of having the same conversation (Aw, boy or girl? Twins?! Do twins run in your family? etc. etc.) with every stranger that popped in to use the printer. Hence, a giant jacket, large enough to disguise a second trimester twins bump but light enough to look unassumingly indoors-y. 

I did make some changes to the pattern--like many people I only used the one half of the neck binding, to make it narrower. I also changed the pockets and collar/front band seaming. All of these were inspired by Japanese streetwear brand Visvim. Here is one version of their Dotera coat, from FW18 I think:


I was not going to attempt welt pockets with pregnancy brain fog, but I kept the angled pockets by just redrafting the pocket piece and sewing it into the front band and side seam. If you look at my close up shot, you can also see that I have a seam mid-front band, and some interior ties, also inspired by this coat. I added some interior patch pockets and I can't remember if that was based on this coat or not! My plan was to add zigzag topstitching to the front band too, for a full copycat look, but I ran out of coordinating thread and haven't gotten any as of today. I could still do it, I suppose. 

The exterior of this is Robert Kaufmann Ventana twill, the same fabric I used for my Deer and Doe trench. The lining is a mid-weight linen. I included the photo of the back with the lining rolling out because I would suggest anyone making this pattern use a little self-fabric facing on the hem--it would give it a bit of structure and prevent this from happening. In the Visvim coat, you can see that there's some of the exterior fabric visible at the hem on the inside. I assume this is a more traditional coat hem but for laziness's sake, using a self-fabric facing would let you follow the instructions as written and doesn't involve any drafting beyond one rectangle for which the height doesn't really even matter. 

If you are here at the end, thanks for reading! Let's all place bets on when google stops supporting blogger. 

xoxo,
allie

ps: apologies for the indoor photos--it's all we're getting for the forseeable future haha


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Baby Shower Dress (Simplicity 6820)

Hello! Today I'm here with my one and only maternity make ;)

If you've followed this blog for any amount of time you'll know I have a few standard patterns I return to again and again. One of my favorite all-time dresses is this leopard print swing dress, which I wear all. the. time. It's also been a go-to item in my maternity wardrobe since it is... quite voluminous. For my baby shower luncheon, I knew I wanted to make something special and that I could wear post-baby, so this same pattern, vintage Simplicity 6820, was a natural choice. I knew it would fit and that I liked the shape on me both pre- and mid-pregnancy.

I (as you can probably tell) made some modifications this time around! I've only ever made it with short sleeves, in fact, I usually make the sleeves slightly shorter than they are as drafted. This time I wanted to change it up and added long sleeves with gathered cuffs. These aren't too dramatic--I just extended the length, rather than adding a major bell. I also altered the neckline slightly--it isn't quite a boatneck as written but it is a bit wide, especially for a vintage pattern where you often find those super-tight jewel necklines, so I brought it in a little bit in the sides and back. One change I did not make is perhaps worth mentioning--I didn't extend the center front hem. Several of my other versions of this dress have a bit of a uneven hem due to the fabric relaxing and honestly, it doesn't bother me. I did let this hem settle overnight beforehemming, but I figure I'd rather deal with a lifted from hem now and then have it look normal later, rather than the other way around. Whatever.

I wore this to the shower luncheon with tights and black heels and was comfortable (or as comfortable as one can be at 29 weeks with twins) and felt chic (or at least as chic as one can feel at 29 weeks with twins). I've been wearing black this whole pregnancy--part of the reason I Overtoned my hair pink!--but this was much more glam than my usual Citizens of Humanity black maternity skinnies and target brand maternity tanks and tees.

Thank you for reading, and thank you for sticking around through this extended period of very little sewing output! I appreciate you all so much.

xoxo,
allie

ps: lot of good and interesting thoughts on maternity sewing from someone who actually made maternity clothes here and here!



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Spring Blush (True Bias Roscoe Dress)

Just a quick note that I have a guest post up on the Minerva Craft blog! You can see more photos of this dress and read my review here.

xoxo,
allie



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Flannel (Closet Case Carolyn Pajamas)

Thank you to Minerva Crafts for providing the materials for this project. I have a blog post over on their blog today with all the details, check it out!

ps: this project was technically part of 2019's #makenine. although it got bumped into this year's posting schedule over at Minerva, it was sewn in 2019!



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Coated Denim Ginger Jeans


I've been on a pants roll, y'all! It must be cooling down here in North Carolina since I recently remade the Ash jeans (as yet unblogged) and now another pair of Gingers. These are totally different than any previous jeans I've made though, because I used this suuuuper cool coated black denim. I ordered this from The Fabric Store in Australia because I couldn't find anything similar anywhere closer, and paid almost as much for shipping as for the materials, so I bumped it way up my to-sew list for fear of it languishing in my stash for ages, staring at me and making me feel guilty. The coating is not wax, like some coated jeans are, it's some sort of plastic-y something--it's not a bad plastic-y, I just don't know what it is. Underneath the coating is a nice black denim with about 15% stretch--perrrfect for some skinny jeans! These aren't the most forgiving/comfortable of jeans--but then again, they aren't for every day wear.

I went with the Gingers instead of the Ash jeans for two reasons--the fly instructions and the pocket bags. First, for this slightly shiny fabric, I really wanted to have the flattering interior pocket stay. Second, this fabric is a bit unforgiving when it comes to unpicking, and the Ginger fly which requires less unpicking than the Ash jeans.

As I mentioned, the coating on this fabric does show little pinpricks wherever there was a needle or pin hole, so this was an interesting challenge in terms of construction! I pinned only in the seam allowances and was extra careful not to do more unpicking than required by the pattern. I do have a couple little spots I messed up on, but my mistakes aren't visible unless you are looking for it, so I'm not stressed about it.

It's still a little bit too warm most days to wear coated denim, but I'm really excited to wear these this fall with an oversized sweater or hoodie, or dressed up with booties and a cute top. It's a little bit out of my comfort zone (I am after all a 30 year old librarian, haha) and I don't anticipate wearing these, like, every week, but I do think they will be perfect for nights out!

xoxo,
allie

ps: ummmm these will be so cute with my memento mori sweatshirrrtttttt



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End of Summer Sudley #2 (Harts Fabric)


Thank you Harts Fabric for providing the fabric and thread for this post. If you haven't shopped online with Harts Fabric before, they have a thread matching program that is the besssst. Just check "Matching Gutermann Thread" when you add yardage to your cart and they will pick the best match thread color and send it with your fabric. Genius.
A couple of weeks ago I showed you a button-back Sudley dress in olive green and today I'm back with part two! These two dresses are the same exact pattern but I think they have very distinct feels since even though both fabrics are rayons, they are totally different! For dress number one in olive, I used a gorgeous Tencel twill, a drapey, medium weight woven. For this one, I used this pretty coral pink viscose, which is a little less densely woven for a floatier lightweight feel.

The skirt on this coral version is, you can probably see, a bit fuller than the olive version. For the olive dress, I used one width of fabric: 60", or about 1.5 times the circumference of the bodice. Because the tencel twill is heavier and has a bit more body, a fuller skirt would make the dress pretty heavy--this would be okay with a fitted, structured bodice, but with this silhouette it would potentially hang weirdly.

The coral rayon is a lighter weight, so the gathered skirt is about twice as wide as the bodice. The difference from 1.5x to 2x may not seem like a lot but it can make a big difference visually! I also added some elastic to the waist for a more fit and flare silhouette. You can do this simply by zig zagging some 1/2" elastic to your waistline seam allowances; it's really easy but makes a big impact. Between the slightly increased fullness and the elasticated waist, the skirt here feels much swishier, which I love. I quickly made a sash but I think I might add some thread loops on the side seams for a proper belt.

Both this dress and the olive version are easy to wear, comfortable, and will transition nicely from late summer into fall here in North Carolina--I can totally picture either with black tights and boots and a cute jacket.

Overall, I really enjoyed sewing and wearing both the viscose and the tencel twill, and it's fun to have a few different variations of rayon in my repertoire. If you are a beginner to drapey fabrics, I recommend the tencel twill, as it is a bit sturdier and less shifty on the cutting table--but both are definitely doable even for an adventurous beginner, and a great way to "level up" your sewing from cottons!

xoxo,
allie

ps: 



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